Image
1 votes
97
Description

A distribution is largely driven by its developer and user communities. Some vendors develop and fund their distributions on a volunteer basis, Debian being a well-known example. Others maintain a community version of their commercial distributions, as Red Hat does with Fedora, and SUSE does with openSUSE.

 

In many cities and regions, local associations known as Linux User Groups (LUGs) seek to promote their preferred distribution and by extension free software. They hold meetings and provide free demonstrations, training, technical support, and operating system installation to new users. Many Internet communities also provide support to Linux users and developers. Most distributions and free software / open-source projects have IRC chatrooms or newsgroups. Online forums are another means for support, with notable examples being LinuxQuestions.org and the various distribution specific support and community forums, such as ones for Ubuntu, Fedora, and Gentoo. Linux distributions host mailing lists; commonly there will be a specific topic such as usage or development for a given list.

 

There are several technology websites with a Linux focus. Print magazines on Linux often bundle cover disks that carry software or even complete Linux distributions.

 

Although Linux distributions are generally available without charge, several large corporations sell, support, and contribute to the development of the components of the system and of free software. An analysis of the Linux kernel showed 75 percent of the code from December 2008 to January 2010 was developed by programmers working for corporations, leaving about 18 percent to volunteers and 7% unclassified. Major corporations that provide contributions include Dell, IBM, HP, Oracle, Sun Microsystems (now part of Oracle) and Nokia. A number of corporations, notably Red Hat, Canonical and SUSE, have built a significant business around Linux distributions.

 

The free software licenses, on which the various software packages of a distribution built on the Linux kernel are based, explicitly accommodate and encourage commercialization; the relationship between a Linux distribution as a whole and individual vendors may be seen as symbiotic. One common business model of commercial suppliers is charging for support, especially for business users. A number of companies also offer a specialized business version of their distribution, which adds proprietary support packages and tools to administer higher numbers of installations or to simplify administrative tasks.

 

Another business model is to give away the software in order to sell hardware. This used to be the norm in the computer industry, with operating systems such as CP/M, Apple DOS and versions of Mac OS prior to 7.6 freely copyable (but not modifiable). As computer hardware standardized throughout the 1980s, it became more difficult for hardware manufacturers to profit from this tactic, as the OS would run on any manufacturer's computer that shared the same architecture.

 

Information
PFPWebHost
More Power, More Control!
23.04.2018 (298 days ago)
ibm 

 

Recommend

 

More Power, More Contro!

 

PFPWebHost - An Arizona Corporation


PFPWebHost Online Services  Service Agreements Umbrella Web Corp. Find us
 
 

 


 

PFPWebHost Reseller AcoountJoin our team of franchise or you can even start your own business. Creating a multiple source of income is very important for both personal & professional. Read More Partners Network : Meet up with other experts such as webmasters, web developers, and newbies looking forward to share and communicate what they do best.  Read More

 

 

Third-party logos, marks, contents are registered trademarks of their respective owners. All rights reserved. 

Use of this Site is subject to express Terms of Use. By using this Site, you signify that you agree to be bound by these Terms of Use, which were last revised on October 242012.

            PFPWebHost UK - More Power, More Control!  ¦  PFPWebHost - Plus de puissance, Plus de contrôle!